DIABETES TO NEWLY DIAGNOSED PATIENTS

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DIABETESTO NEWLY DIAGNOSED PATIENTS

Nameof Student

InstitutionAffiliation

Thereexist various types of diabetes in the world with the most commonlyknown being diabetes Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 results from thedestruction of the B-cells that results in the deficiency of thehormone insulin in the body while Type 2 is a condition where thereis a defect in the secretion of insulin on the background of insulinresistance.[ CITATION Mic08 l 1033 ]Besides, the two primary types of diabetes are other types thatresult from such causes as genetic defects in insulin function andgenetic defectsin B-cell function.

Moreoften than not people newly diagnosed with diabetes receive such newswith a lot of shocks. They tend to believe that this would mark theend of life in them. Studies have shown that those people who havebeen diagnosed of Type 2 diabetes suffer depression as a result ofthese findings. The depression symptoms are related to an alterationin the lifestyle of the diagnosed people. These patients develop alot of negative emotions that may result in stress prompting anincrease in the level of some of the hormones of the body.

Thenegative feelings may cause harm to the control of glucose hence thequality of life. Being diagnosed with diabetes should never beunderstood as the end of leading an ordinary life. With the aid ofthe numerous medical professionals, the patients are advised on howto go about their conditions well. A proper comprehension of the typeof diabetes one has been diagnosed with provides a good basis andguide on which type of lifestyle to lead after that. [ CITATION Kar05 l 1033 ]

Educationstrategies

  1. Establishing a plan based on the priorities of the patient. This education will do a comprehensive assessment of the needs of the patient using various teaching tools as Body Apron. An understanding of the attitudes and the health beliefs of the patient about diabetes is looked into in this strategy. Whether the patient beliefs that the disease is worse or mild is established by engaging the patients by asking him questions related to his condition. This strategy can build the patient`s confidence in his ability to manage himself.[ CITATION Mic08 l 1033 ] It is also informative to both the patient and the educators as there is an exchange of information.

  2. Setting individual goals for control and taking action goals. This strategy informs the patients on the causes of diabetes such as high blood pressure thus giving a baseline on which control of the disease can be done. Most of the patients are unaware of their blood pressure and glucose levels making this strategy less comprehensible to them.

  3. Diabetes education is a process rather than an event. This informs the patients that diabetes is a progressive disease hence requires a continuous education and enlightenment to control and manage. This makes the patients give the disease a life-long process of learning.[ CITATION Kar05 l 1033 ] Unfortunately, most of the people do not understand the progressive nature of diabetes thus lose hope once diagnosed with the disease.

  4. Empowering patients to take charge in the control of diabetes. This is an opportunity for the patients to practice skills that increase the chances of their success, for example, engaging in physical exercises and taking glucose level checks. Some patients do not appreciate the need of such empowerments hence, may opt to ignore them.

  5. Nutrition and diet types. Being a lifestyle disease, diabetes education should give a lot of focus on the kinds of foods the patients take.[ CITATION Mic08 l 1033 ] Knowing the types of nutrients to use would help in controlling the levels of various substances in the body. Some patients treat the new lifestyle with negative emotions leading to more harmful effects on their body.

Bibliography

Edmonds, M. E. (2008). A Practical Manual for Diabetic Foot Care. London: John Wiley &amp Sons.

Stallings, K. D. (2005). Patient Education in Health and Illness. Chicago: Lippincott Williams &amp Wilkins.

DIABETES TO NEWLY DIAGNOSED PATIENTS

  • Uncategorized

DIABETESTO NEWLY DIAGNOSED PATIENTS

Nameof Student

InstitutionAffiliation

Thereexist various types of diabetes in the world with the most commonlyknown being diabetes Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 results from thedestruction of the B-cells that results in the deficiency of thehormone insulin in the body while Type 2 is a condition where thereis a defect in the secretion of insulin on the background of insulinresistance.[ CITATION Mic08 l 1033 ]Besides, the two primary types of diabetes are other types thatresult from such causes as genetic defects in insulin function andgenetic defectsin B-cell function.

Moreoften than not people newly diagnosed with diabetes receive such newswith a lot of shocks. They tend to believe that this would mark theend of life in them. Studies have shown that those people who havebeen diagnosed of Type 2 diabetes suffer depression as a result ofthese findings. The depression symptoms are related to an alterationin the lifestyle of the diagnosed people. These patients develop alot of negative emotions that may result in stress prompting anincrease in the level of some of the hormones of the body.

Thenegative feelings may cause harm to the control of glucose hence thequality of life. Being diagnosed with diabetes should never beunderstood as the end of leading an ordinary life. With the aid ofthe numerous medical professionals, the patients are advised on howto go about their conditions well. A proper comprehension of the typeof diabetes one has been diagnosed with provides a good basis andguide on which type of lifestyle to lead after that. [ CITATION Kar05 l 1033 ]

Educationstrategies

  1. Establishing a plan based on the priorities of the patient. This education will do a comprehensive assessment of the needs of the patient using various teaching tools as Body Apron. An understanding of the attitudes and the health beliefs of the patient about diabetes is looked into in this strategy. Whether the patient beliefs that the disease is worse or mild is established by engaging the patients by asking him questions related to his condition. This strategy can build the patient`s confidence in his ability to manage himself.[ CITATION Mic08 l 1033 ] It is also informative to both the patient and the educators as there is an exchange of information.

  2. Setting individual goals for control and taking action goals. This strategy informs the patients on the causes of diabetes such as high blood pressure thus giving a baseline on which control of the disease can be done. Most of the patients are unaware of their blood pressure and glucose levels making this strategy less comprehensible to them.

  3. Diabetes education is a process rather than an event. This informs the patients that diabetes is a progressive disease hence requires a continuous education and enlightenment to control and manage. This makes the patients give the disease a life-long process of learning.[ CITATION Kar05 l 1033 ] Unfortunately, most of the people do not understand the progressive nature of diabetes thus lose hope once diagnosed with the disease.

  4. Empowering patients to take charge in the control of diabetes. This is an opportunity for the patients to practice skills that increase the chances of their success, for example, engaging in physical exercises and taking glucose level checks. Some patients do not appreciate the need of such empowerments hence, may opt to ignore them.

  5. Nutrition and diet types. Being a lifestyle disease, diabetes education should give a lot of focus on the kinds of foods the patients take.[ CITATION Mic08 l 1033 ] Knowing the types of nutrients to use would help in controlling the levels of various substances in the body. Some patients treat the new lifestyle with negative emotions leading to more harmful effects on their body.

Bibliography

Edmonds, M. E. (2008). A Practical Manual for Diabetic Foot Care. London: John Wiley &amp Sons.

Stallings, K. D. (2005). Patient Education in Health and Illness. Chicago: Lippincott Williams &amp Wilkins.

Diabetes to Newly Diagnosed Patients

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DIABETES TO NEWLY DIAGNOSED PATIENTS 4

Diabetesto Newly Diagnosed Patients

Whenpatients are newly diagnosed with diabetes, most patients findthemselves in a state of shock. Nevertheless, what they do not knowis that being diagnosed with diabetes does not prevent anyone fromleading the normal life. When newly diagnosed with diabetes, it isimportant to educate the patients on how they can lead a normal life.This report will discuss the impact of diabetes on newly diagnosedpatients and offer education to these patients. Also, the report willdiscuss the evaluation strategies that would be used as well as theirmerits and demerits.

Patientswould react differently when they are diagnosed with diabetes. Inmost cases, people become confused and overwhelmed when they becomediagnosed with diabetes. Since diabetes results from a situationwhere the body fails to produce or properly utilize insulin, it canhave impacts on patients. One of the impacts of diabetes is that itcan result in kidney failure. Other implications of diabetes are thatit can lead to increased risk of getting stroke and heart disease.Also, in some cases, it can result in nervous system disease(Dunning, 2013).

Whenpatients are newly diagnosed with diabetes, it is crucial to provideeducation to the patients so as to help the patients lead an ordinarylife. One of the education areas that patients should be taught aboutconcerns the basics of diabetes. In this case, newly diagnosedpatients are introduced to what is diabetes, the kinds of diabetesthat are there, the causes, and the impacts of diabetes. Whenproviding education on the basics of diabetes, it is important forthe educator to provide the patients with an environment where theyare offered an opportunity to ask any question regarding diabetes(Dunning, 2013).

Anotherarea that the educators should teach the newly diagnosed patientsconcerns how to improve their health after being diagnosed withdiabetes. In this area, the educator should teach the patients theelements that are critical in ensuring healthy living, despite beingdiagnosed with diabetes. The educator should teach on exercising,diet, stress management, as well as blood sugar monitoring. The tutorshould help patients understand different ways that they can exercisetheir bodies, the right diet and the foods to avoid, ways of managingstress, and how to monitor their blood sugar (Weinger &amp Carver,2009).

Evaluationneed to be carried out throughout the learning process. In mostcases, it has been recommended that an evaluation be done after 3-6months (Weinger &amp Carver, 2009). There are different evaluationstrategies that can be used. One of the evaluation strategies isbiomedical indicators. In this case, indicators such as bloodglucose, blood pressure, BMI and lipids can be used. Anotherevaluation strategy includes the use of psychosocial indicators.Here, indicators such as quality of life, attitudes, well-being,locus of control, mental health, and social support are used (Weinger&amp Carver, 2009). Analysis of self-management behavior is anotherevaluation tool that can be used. Also, evaluation may be donethrough testing the diabetes knowledge that a patient has.Furthermore, cost analysis can be used as an evaluation strategy.

Anadvantage of using the evaluation strategies highlighted above isthat they provide educators with additional educational needs for thepatients. Upon using the evaluation methods, educators are in aposition to identify whether the patients are thorough with thediabetes education or they need additional education. However, thetechniques have a disadvantage in that they consume time before theoutcomes are known.

References

Dunning,T. (2013). Diabeteseducation: Art, science, and evidence.Chichester, West Sussex: Wiley-Blackwell.

Weinger,K., &amp Carver, C. A. (2009). Educatingyour patient with diabetes.New York: Humana Press.

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