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Commentfor Sara Allen

Iagree with you that there are different cultures, all which influencehow we treat nature and how we interpret the environment. In myopinion, I think the way these cultures have shaped the societydetermines greatly how people handle the environment. In addition,the example of the American Indian gives us the reason why thesecultures are really important. In this regard, I propose that we havea dominant perspective that controls the behavior of people towardsthe environment, but must preserve the cultures. This is because thecultures of the people influence the behaviors. Taking the case ofthe United States, the white Americans are less focused on theenvironment because they do not have the foundation of the reverencefor nature. Therefore, a dominant perspective will only be valid forthese people who are not guided by the cultural values. All in all, Itotally agree with you that the differences in the cultures influenceour approach to nature and the environment.

Commentfor Felix Boeschen

Youhave made an interesting observation about the evolution of theAmerican society into a multicultural nation. I agree with youtotally on this. This is a very great way of arguing the points onthe topic. It is the development of the society into a multiculturalnation that has affected the levels of managing the resources of thecountry. The people, who grew with the native values of reveringnature, have become conservers of the environment. On the other side,the people who have no touch with the cultural values do see noreason to preserve nature. This means that the values for nature andenvironment are the key constituents of a perspective that can makemanagement of the American natural resources better. A good case isthat of the native Indians who considered nature and the environmentpart of their life behavior. In this light, a dominant perspectivecan only be beneficial if and only if, it preserves these values.

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